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Child Support Archives

Child support skirted by voluntary impoverishment

Parents in Pennsylvania may find it increasingly difficult to enforce child support agreements due to a practice called voluntary impoverishment. The process relies on the strategic manipulation of the system through under-reporting payments and earnings to the IRS to avoid child support obligations.

Public assistance agencies place priority on child support

A parent in Pennsylvania pursuing a separation or divorce might hit financial hard times. This is especially common when one parent was financially dependent on a spouse. Loss of income due to separation or divorce might prompt someone to apply for public assistance. Government agencies, however, will want details about child support payments before awarding benefits like food, housing, or childcare assistance. If child support payments have not been officially set up through a court, a public assistance agency might seek to collect the support money to offset taxpayer expenses to the dependent child or parent.

Understanding more about child support payments

When Pennsylvania parents split up, child support can be a key issue. These funds can be critical for providing for a child's needs, including educational, medical and personal expenses. Many people across the country have little understanding of child support statistics. However, it can be very important for people going through the process to learn more about what they may expect.

Considering remarriage and child support payments

People in Pennsylvania who go through a divorce may wonder about the impact that remarriage can have on child support. In many cases, people who remarry may seek to have more children in the future as part of their new marriage. In other cases, people marry other single parents and take on at least some of the financial responsibilities for raising their children. It can be particularly important for divorced parents to understand the impact that different scenarios can have on their child support entitlements and obligations.

How to terminate child support orders in Pennsylvania

Noncustodial parents are generally required to pay child support to help custodial parents raise a child. However, it is possible that a parent who is receiving support can request that those payments be stopped. This generally occurs when parents choose to get back together after a separation or divorce. If the parents are back together, there is no reason to mandate a certain level of support.

Federal system aims to enhance child support collection

Child support enforcement can be a major concern for single parents in Pennsylvania struggling to make ends meet after a delinquent parent fails to pay. These funds can be critical to maintaining a child's health, welfare and education, and enforcing child support orders can be an important public policy priority for both federal and state officials. One frequently used and successful tactic to enforce existing support orders is the use of wage garnishment or payroll deductions to process payments directly from an employee's paycheck.

How to compel a parent to pay child support

Pennsylvania parents who are ordered to pay child support must comply with that order. While there may be many reasons why a parent may not want to comply, there are consequences for failure to do so. Primarily, child support payments are designed to ensure that both parents are contributing to the upbringing of their child. There are several factors that go into determining how much support a custodial parent is entitled to.

Consequences of delinquent child support

Family courts may order one parent to pay child support when they don't live in the same home as the child. Pennsylvania parents may need to start paying financial support for their child when one spouse files for divorce or when unmarried parents separate. These payments are meant to help the child or children have a lifestyle similar to what they would have if their parents lived together. Failure to pay court-ordered child support has consequences.

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